Category Archives: Awesome Women Testers

WOMEN TESTERS JANUARY 2017 EDITION

WOMEN TESTERS – JANUARY 2017 EDITION

January 2017 edition of Women Testers is brought to you by the team of Women Testers in association with Testing Circus.

In this edition, we have bought to you the following articles: “Not Invented Here” by Claire Moss

A guest post  “Are Test Cases Dead?” authored by Sandeep Garg

A frequent speaker at international conferences writes about the “Benefits of public speaking” – Karen N Johnson

Check out this reading list by Parimala Hariprasad and her review of the books she read in “Bibliography – Books I read in 2016″

Amanda Perkins has authored a write-up about “ISO Multilingual Testers”

We look forward to you reading and sharing this edition which also has a special editorial written by Keith Klain titled “Nevertheless, she persisted…”

From around the testing world: These software testing conferences are lined up for March 2017 Agile Testing Days, Asia and Agile India. Do write to us at editor@womentesters.com and share your article for the upcoming edition of Women Testers by March 20th 2017.

Upcoming conferences:

Test Master’s Academy brings to you 2ND ANNUAL TEST LEADERSHIP CONGRESS – MAY 1ST-3RD, NewYork City.  Watch this video to learn more: https://youtu.be/ldKUOGOK2BM 

Thank you for your awesomeness authors and for the timely submissions. And Testing Circus for your continued inspiration and patronage.

Co-ordinator and Editor
Jyothi Rangaiah

WOMEN TESTERS OCTOBER 2016 EDITION

WOMEN TESTERS – OCTOBER 2016 EDITION

Software testing e-magazineOctober 2016 edition of Women Testers is brought to you by the team of Women Testers in association with Testing Circus and with the support of Keith Klain.

In this edition, we have bought to you the following articles: A guest post  “Testing is Dead” (Again) Thanks to DevOps written by Lee Hawkins.
For the first time, women testers features an article from a veteran from the tech world A Critical Path to Problem Resolution by Bruce Seaman.

An article for our new testers by a new tester, Himansha Tyagi who writes about her Journey of A Newbie Tester 

Helena Jeret-Mäe shares her experiences in the form of Lessons from Observing an Organization

What are your testing knowledge sources? As a reply to this question, Ajay Balamurugadas writes his sources of testing know-how in the article titled My Sources of Testing Knowledge

And a candid editorial by Karennjohnson to make us all think about the changing testing profession and the growing need to up-skill/reinvent ourselves as testers.

From around the testing world: Call For Papers is now open for EuroSTAR2017.  Take time out to respond to the early bird registrations CASTx17

We look forward to reading and sharing your new learning experiences while you are at these software testing conferences lined up for December 2016 Software Testing Conference, Peers of Estonian Software Testing (PEST), Agile testing days, NFTCon. Do write to us at editor@womentesters.com and share your article for the upcoming edition of Women Testers by December 30th 2016.

Thank you for your awesomeness authors and for the timely submissions. And Testing Circus for your continued inspiration and patronage.

Co-ordinator and Editor
Jyothi Rangaiah

WOMEN TESTERS – 2nd Anniversary edition

WOMEN TESTERS – JULY 2016 – 9th EDITION

July 2016 edition of Women Testers is brought to you by the team of Women Testers and in association with Testing Circus.

This edition features guest editorial by Alison Wade, President at Techwell and founder of Women who Test.

We have brought to you articles from these test practitioners. Download your copy today of this e-magazine whose readership spans across 40 countries, the top 5 representation of our subscribers are based out of USA, India, UK, Australia and Canada respectively. Thank you readers for your continued readership.

5 Challenges in Software Test Management by Farzeen Abbas

Creating Positive Experiences on Mobile Apps by Parimala Hariprasad (http://curioustester.blogspot.com/)

Dog Show Quality by James Lyndsay (http://blackboxpuzzles.workroomprds.com/)

How Albina Wrecked my Tester Evaluation Method by James Bach (http://www.satisfice.com/blog/)

Womentesters Coverpage
Womentesters second anniversary edition

Journey towards Performance Analytics & Prediction by Ramya Ramalinga Moorthy

User Story Traceability by Mahalakshmi Devi

Do write to us at editor@womentesters.com and share your article for the upcoming edition of Women Testers by September 10th, 2016

Thank you for your awesomeness authors and for the timely submissions. And Testing Circus for your continued inspiration and patronage.

Download your copy of women testers today and those of you who wish to write for the future editions of the e-magazine download the article template here. For any feedback on this edition, do write to us at editor@womentesters.com

What’s new in the testing world? CAST comes to Sydney! Answer to the call for papers by October 15, 2016.  Follow CAST2016 Twitter feeds as it happens here – https://twitter.com/AST_News. Courtesy: AST and Claire Moss

CAST2017

Co-ordinator and Editor
Jyothi Rangaiah

WOMEN TESTERS – APRIL 2016 EDITION

WOMEN TESTERS – APRIL 2016 – 8th EDITION

The cover page of the 8th edition of women testers e-magazine is designed by Abhimanyu Tadwalkar
The cover page of the 8th edition of women testers e-magazine is designed by Abhimanyu Tadwalkar

April 2016 edition of Women Testers is brought to you by the team of Women Testers which includes Jyothi Rangaiah and Paul Seaman and in association with Testing Circus.

In this edition we have brought to you the following articles by veteran and newbie testers:

The art of asking questions by Karen N Johnson

What Questioning Means to a Testing Newcomer by Amanda Halvordsson
Who? When? What? Which? Why? Where? How? by Fake Software Tester
Color Psychology by Parimala Hariprasad
Comparing Car Inspection to Testing by Tuula Pääkkönen
My Experiment With Lean Testing by Mohit Verma
An interview – Women Leadership in Testing Arena with Renu Rajani
Upsurge in Savvy Performance Analysis Tools Leading to Enigmatic Trend by Ramya Ramalinga Moorthy
The guest editorial as you noticed is authored by Paul Seaman

Do write to us at editor@womentesters.com and share your article for the upcoming edition of Women Testers by June 10th 2016.

Thank you for your awesomeness authors and for the timely submissions. And Testing Circus for your continued inspiration and patronage.

Download your copy of women testers today and those of you who wish to write for the future editions of the e-magazine download the article template here. For any feedback on this edition, do write to us at editor@womentesters.com

Co-ordinator and Editor
Jyothi Rangaiah

WOMEN TESTERS – OCTOBER 2015 EDITION

WOMEN TESTERS – OCTOBER 2015 EDITION

Oct2015

October 2015 edition of Women Testers is brought to you by the team of Women Testers and in association with Testing Circus.

In this edition we have bought to you the following articles:
A guest post on Mindmapping essentials written by Dhanasekar Subramaniam

A co-authored post on Stress And Work written by Annie Rydholm and Paul Seaman

Parimala Hariprasad writes about her research on Competitor Analysis
Rikke Simonsen shares her experiences about Making The Transition From Manual To Automated Testing
A first timer at Women Testers Alexandra Schladebeck has shared a write-up on Some Words About Words
If you have liked reading about Testing in the Cloud – Part II written by Nitika Katiyar in our previous edition, this edition has the final part of this article.

Yes, Call For Papers is now open for NULLCON 2016.

We look forward to reading and sharing your new learning experiences while you are at these software testing conferences lined up for November 2015 EclipseCon, TestBashNY, EuroSTAR Conference 2015, Better Software Conference, LET’S TEST [South Africa]. Do write to us at editor@womentesters.com and share your article for the upcoming edition of Women Testers by December 20th 2015.

Thank you for your awesomeness authors and for the timely submissions. And Testing Circus for your continued inspiration and patronage.

Co-ordinator and Editor
Jyothi Rangaiah

WOMEN TESTERS – JULY 2015 ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Women-Testers-Edition-05-July-2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anniversary edition

July 2015 edition of Women Testers is brought to you by the team of Women Testers and in association with Testing Circus

In this edition:

  • Recoverability Testing and UX Connection – Parimala Hariprasad
  • Q&A with Applause – Women Testers Team
  • A Different perspective on what to look for in a Test Lead – Nicola Owen
  • A Day in the life of Agile Software Quality Enthusiast – Manisha Awasthi
  • Testing Your Habits – Annie Rydholm
  • Testing in the Cloud: Part 1 – Nitika Katiyar
  • Is Manual Testing Losing It’ s Sheen – Divya Madaan

Thank you for your awesomeness authors and for the timely submissions . And Testing Circus for your continued inspiration and patronage.

The cover page image is the courtesy of piktochart.

Coordinator and Editor
Jyothi Rangaiah

 

Domain Knowledge – Is it important to Testers?

In today’s market testing has become essential entity across any domain like Banking, Financial Services and Insurance (BFSI), Retail, Health Care, Transportation and so on. As the testing industry grows, a tester with basic skill is not sufficient to meet the market needs. Market now demands domain and subject experience. Having said that doesn’t mean they don’t need software testing knowledge. Domain knowledge is used to derive business use cases and software testing knowledge is used to derive ideas to test the limits of the technology.

knowledge

Majority of the testers would agree that it is unfair to not hire a tester just because he/she does not have prior domain knowledge. This could be justified by the testers who had to start somewhere at some point where they didn’t have testing experience or testing skills. They learnt on the job and added value to the projects they worked on. But can these testers test an application without knowing how a particular business works? What about the risk involved with hiring a poor domain knowledge tester?

Let’s understand this:

1. Online Banking – Tester has to test online banking flows few of which include login, transfers, bill payment. To login a tester might need basic testing knowledge but to do modules like transfers and bill payment, a tester needs to be a subject matter expert. One should understand the business logic on money flows.

2.  Health Care systems may not consider testers without prior knowledge, as it would risk some- one’s life.

3.  Retail: Retail domain In Store Solutions, Enter- prise management, and Warehouse manage- ment. One needs to understand the basic flow at every level for the service to run successfully. Ex: If I were to test POS, I need to know about POS before I can actually test it.

With this being said, a tester also has to understand the ground reality. It is quite a challenging task to build and maintain a team rich in testing and domain knowledge

How can testers gain domain knowledge without prior experience in the domain?

1. Plan
To increase domain knowledge is to come up with a plan of attack. Knowledge is vast and one cannot gain all in just a day. You need to filter down the amount of knowledge you are trying to absorb into pieces and attack it gradually.

For example: if you may say you want to become a domain expert in banking. But which area of banking, specifically? Retail banking, investment banking or private banking? Or it doesn’t matter to you?

2. Ask Questions

Ws Asking questions is an art in itself and if you want to build up knowl- edge, you need to know WHO to ask, WHAT quest ions to ask and WHEN to ask them. Then you also need to record the answers from others so you build up knowledge base for yourself.

3. Internet one of your best friends to pick up domain knowledge. There are so many websites which showcase the knowledge and yes you have online courses too. So start your search, register, read and gain as much knowledge as you can.

4. Find a Mentormentoring

Finding a mentor who has years of domain knowledge acquired kills two birds with one stone – you get guidance on your career and you ALSO get to strength- en the domain knowledge.

Wrapping Up
Now we know why domain knowledge is important and some tips on how to increase the domain knowl- edge. As with all learning, the most important aspect of increasing domain knowledge is your DESIRE to learn. If you have the desire, no hurdle will be great enough to block you from gaining anything.

Always desire to learn something useful – Sophocles

That’s all I have for now. Stay positive and have fun picking up domain knowledge in your projects.

About the Author

Ajitha Mannem is a senior test engineer with 9 years of experience in software testing and is currently working for a banking institute. You can learn more about Ajitha at www.linkedin.com/in/ajithamannem

Design Patterns in Test Automation World

Software development has lot of methodologies and standardized approaches to make the development process efficient such as object oriented programming, domain-driven design, test-driven design and behaviour driven design etc. Automation testing, since the very beginning, has been relatively new when it comes to processes and standards. But now it has gained lot of exposure in terms of standardization and has been under the process of continuous improvement and evolvement through design patterns. Automation testing is a process of developing software to test software. Hence, the test patterns are loosely similar to design patterns that are used in software development.

Design patterns show how to design the test automation testware so that it will be efficient and easy to maintain. The most challenging part in test automation has always been the code maintenance. A lot of test automation projects have drowned or were scrapped due to the inability of the frameworks to cope up with the growing codebases. In order to keep the maintenance cost low, the automation engineers should strive to minimize the code that they reinvent or create from scratch by using existing functionality for common, generic, or repeated operations.

model1

What are the types of Design Patterns in test automation?

1. Design Patterns in Test implementation
From the test implementation perspective, different design patterns can be understood as types of automation frameworks (illustrated in Figure 1):

Patterns2. Architectural Design Patterns

Pattern2

MultiLayeredArch

MetaFramework

3. Functional Design Patterns

pattern3

 

testclass

What are the advantages of using Design Patterns?

The use of design patterns offers below advantages:
– Low maintenance effort and time
– Low maintenance cost
– Enhanced code reusability
– Enhanced reliability
– Structured codebase which is easy to fix and extend
–  Improved communication

Conclusion

The design patterns contribute to a major chunk in defining the test automation best practices. The bene- fits of test automation cannot be reaped effectively without implementing the required design patterns specific to a test automation project.

About the Author

Divya Madaan is a test automation specialist with 11 years of experience in quality control. She has extensive experience in various automation tools, frameworks and latest technology. She is currently working with Aspire Systems.

Get Started and Don’t Stop!

This is a story about a recent learning experience of mine. It is not that much about actual testing but I hope that it still can be relevant. That said, I still think any kind of continuous learning effort can make me a better tester.

My quick and dirty way to explain what I do as a tester is that I “explore and report”. That statement, I need to improve, as I have to be able to explain what I do as a professional tester and practicing storytelling might help me in my role as a tester. As a tester, I will have to communicate my findings to colleagues, product owners and other stakeholders for my test effort to get value to anyone else but me and that is the main reason why finding my inner voice and practicing story telling is useful to me, and I hope that it can be for you too.

This story is something that I have postponed writing since the first edition of Women Testers. What kept me from getting started was that I thought my ideas were not good enough to be worth sharing and I thought that I had to wait for the perfect idea to come to me, instead of just starting to write and then revise and review. As I opened the third edition of Women Testers and read, “A YEAR FROM NOW you may wish you had STARTED TODAY” and that got me started.

When I chatted with Jyothi, she told me; “I plan to learn from mentors and gurus who critic my work. So I will learn how to be better than last year.” Her words made me see how I need to forget about getting things right the first time and just get on with it. Later in the process, I can review and gradually refine my ideas on my own and with the help of my peers. My next problem was to continue writing. In order to ever complete something you will have to start and you cannot stop there, you need to keep going! The second habit in 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey informed me that it could be great to begin with the end in mind. However the end goal that I had in mind was an unreachable goal that I set way too high; working with that goal in mind put me through a lot of my pain and misery as I would never be able to reach that goal.

What saved me was an image that I suddenly recalled – I came to think about an image that I had seen in my favourite book. It shows a the field with the word “Engaged” in between the lines of “Levels of Aspirations” and “Level of Expectations” from Chapter 9 in Secrets of a Buccaneer-Scholar. Unfortunately I cannot give you the page number because I ripped it right out of the book a while ago and sent it to my sister – that is how much I love the image. It reminded me to set my expectations at a reasonable level and from that point, I started to enjoy writing. The worries I had of not being able to write the perfect article vanished and I started to write in order to learn. I use this approach with testing too.

Then there is my biggest problem, to stay on track. My wandering mind can be my curse and my super power at the same time. It works in a way that I would like to describe similar to as trying to catch butterflies while riding trains of the London Underground. I have to manage to stay on the same track long enough, or at least return to it, in order to arrive at some kind of destination. I easily get lost but I tend to make interesting and sometimes rare findings!

Becoming skilled at anything takes practice. I am thankful that I found the idea about having a growth mind set rather than a fixed mind set in the book Mindset by Carol S. Dweck. It taught me that it is easier to acquire new skills if I am focusing on my ability to learn here and now, instead of embracing the idea of God given talents.

If you would like to become skilled at something that you love doing, or just want to learn anyway, you have to make room for practice. A friend of mine told me that he wanted to become a writer. A while back, he mentioned how he made the goal of writing one page every night. I asked him about it a few months later, and he reported progress; he said that he was doing well. With his focus shifted from the finished story to the joy of the actual process of writing, he had turned practicing into a habit.

The key to keep on doing something, whether you love it or not, could be to turn it into a habit. Like all sorts of habits, it can be a good or a bad one. Either way, it is likely stick with you until you somehow manage to change it. Recently, I decided to improve my health, my ways of thinking and learn more about psychology. I noticed that if I get ready the day before by preparing a change of clothes and have a great book to listen to, I might even start to crave my ”Think Book Walks”. The book I listened to during one of my walks and that gave me that idea is The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg.

If I would begin with the end in mind next time I am writing something, I would ask the questions “Why am writing this and who am I writing it for?” The answer is that I wrote this for my on sake of practice and the joy of writing. I also wrote it especially for those of you who are about to get started to share your stories. If I have inspired one person to do that, it is a huge win for me. Writing can help you find your inner voice and improve your ability of storytelling.

Looking back at this story one year from now, I hope that I will do so with pride but also that I will think, “I know that I can do better!”

About the Author

Annie Rydholm is a thinker, explorer and a music lover, originally from a tiny little village in the woods of Sweden, who through a detour in Copenhagen and Sydney ended up in Stockholm as a Software Tester.